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Go, Like A Green Light! a PATH review
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Review by Scott Tingley, May 31, 2008

Editor's Note: I reviewed PATH a year ago, but I was just contacted by someone new with the book's publisher about doing a review (done!) so I thought I would bump the piece I did on this little known gem. - Scott

Path is a constantly moving chase driven story with a terrible cast of creatures (like air leeches - who comes up with air leeches!?!?) trying to eat our heroes, rabbit and elephant. That's right; this entire book is one long chase scene with one interlude to introduce a giant hare-driven robot.  Lots of laughs and lots of monsters (and a sort-of sad bit at the end). Oh, and rabbit uses the word ' crud ' every couple of pages. Just thought you should know.

Here is another way you can picture the book. Take the frenetic energy of the squirrel-rat chasing the acorn in the cartoon, Ice Age - apply it to the rest of the movie, strip away all but the most essential plot elements (getting from here to there alive), and you have Path .

I've seen movies that use that premise - one long action scene with some humour sprinkled in for flavour. They usually stink. Some, though, are a whole lot of fun. Path is in the "whole lot of fun" column.

Path solicitation info: " Doppler is a neurotic bunny who doesn't have much in the way of people skills, but when he is cornered by a pack of hungry crocidogs, Dodge rescues him. Dodge is an older Elephant who doesn't see so well, but he needs help getting to his destination and against all odds, Doppler and Dodge form a very special friendship."

It's go, go, go for 80 pages.  And there lies the main flaw of the book.  It is a bit slim for $12.95, but I think it is worth it. It is a quick read, but one I would think kids would go back to over and over. The only other problem I had is that, at times, I found that the beautiful black and white panels drawn by creator, Gregory Baldwin , were a bit hard to follow. To be very clear: the story is not hard to follow, but in my opinion a few of the panels are. Just keep moving and it all clears up, though.

UPDATE: Now that I have been reminded about this comic I am going to get it out and read it with my kids tomorrow (they are almost 3 and almost 5) - I think they will really have fun with it. I just flipped through the book again and it is a bunch of scary-ish monsters chasing an elephant and a rabbit. The monsters are scary, but not gruesome, so I think my kids (who were scared watching the new movie UP, so these are not hardened kids here) will be okay with it. But, I am not saying this is a little kids comic, but it is a kid's comic. You've read what I said and you will have to make your own decision on who should read it, but I usually / almost always err on the side of caution and I think it is great for kids that can handle the Ice Age movies and don't get scared of monsters easily. I will not be sharing it with my 8 year old nephew because he does get worked up over monsters easily.

Tell the folks at your local comic shop that they can order it through the Diamond catalogue using the code JAN083499 (if this sentence makes little sense to you, just write it down and read it to the comic shop guy, and he will know just what to do :) ).



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