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Archie Americana Series: Best of the Nineties - A Review
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Review by Scott Tingley, March 23, 2009

This is going to be a short one, but this is the kind of book you are either going to be sold on right away or you won't. I wrote a whole review for this a month ago, but I just reread it and the bits I thought were clever aren't so much clever as they are not clever, so let's try this again.

What I have in front of me now is a copy of the Archie Americana Series Best of the Nineties (volume 9). I read a ton of Archie Digests as an elementary student (before moving on to superhero stuff in grade six or so) and I actually read a lot now, but I didn't really read much Archie in the nineties. It was nice to see how the feel and tone of the stories doesn't change a whole lot over time, but it does make small changes in order to adjust itself to the new generation of readers. For instance, it was fun seeing the technology and fashions change as the stories went on (It was just a few years ago, but boy did we dress goofy).

This series is great for anyone, young or old, that has or even had an interest in Archie and the Gang. I would really love to take a look at the earlier volumes of this series Arch and friends have really gone through some interesting and dramatic changes over the last sixty or seventy years. In building your Americana Series collection (scroll down the page) I'm not sure if I would start with this one, but the Best of the Nineties would make any Archie fan happy.

I told you this was going to be a short one.

 



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